Everything Royal

 

" Exclusive Offer"

RARE historical, "revealing", never before seen letter collection

from HRH Prince Charles, The Prince of Wales

Future King of England

A collection of 19 letters written between 1997 and 2008

All "reasonable" offers considered

AllA

According to press reports following the resignation of Michael Fawcett from the Prince's Trust, Prince Charles is quoted as stating he has no knowledge of "Honors" given as gratitude for donations to various of the Princes's charities.

The following letters tell a different story. Every letter is regarding money, finding donors and their potential for donations , including letters written on Christmas and New Years day


All letters were written to Robert Higdon managing director of Prince of Wales Foundation in the US.

See article dated September 2021 from a British tablois at the end of this listing.

Michael Fawcett replaced Robert Higdon

 

See arSeeticle

 

Robert M. Higdon, died June 19 at his home in Panama City, Fla. He was 58.

In 1997, Mr. Higdon was named managing director of the Washington-based Prince of Wales Foundation, a charity associated with Prince Charles. Invariably described as charming and personable, Mr. Higdon raised millions of dollars for the organization, which provides support for some of Prince Charles’s primary interests, including architecture, historic preservation and the environment

One of Mr. Higdon’s fund raising tactics was to arrange personal meetings for major donors with Prince Charles and his current wife, Camilla Parker Bowles.

Mr. Higdon’s work with both Thatcher and Prince Charles came under criticism in the British media for what was called lavish spending. In 2011, Mr. Higdon reportedly received more than $600,000 in salary and expense reimbursements from the Prince of Wales Foundation. He stayed at first-class hotels during his frequent international travels, and critics noted that his compensation almost equaled the total amount of money disbursed by the foundation.

Mr. Higdon left the Prince of Wales Foundation in 2011, when his contract was not renewed.

 

 

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Tom Bower 11 Sep 2021

Prince Charles was allegedly 'shocked' and 'surprised' by the exposure of Fawcett’s alleged demands to Mahfouz As one of Charles’s senior staff observed.

Last week, Fawcett, 58, was temporarily suspended as chief executive of Charles’s The Prince’s Foundation after claims he fixed an honour for a Saudi businessman in return for donating more than £1.5million to Charles’s charities. The issue Charles, 72, faces is whether he knew about Fawcett’s promises in a letter to Mahfouz Marei Mubarak bin Mahfouz, 51. Through a spokesman, we learnt Charles was allegedly “shocked” and “surprised” by the exposure of Fawcett’s alleged demands to Mahfouz.

But considering Fawcett’s money-raising activities for the prince over the past 30 years, Charles’s “shock” is hard to believe. Fawcett wrote to Mahfouz in 2017, allegedly indicating that in return for his money, the Saudi would get a knighthood, British citizenship and more private meetings with Prince Charles.

Fawcett’s letter appeared to make a direct connection between Mahfouz getting Charles’s support for a knighthood and citizenship in return for his money.

In an unusual move, Charles’s office issued a statement denying he knew about Fawcett’s offer in exchange for money, but the history of Fawcett’s successful operation over the past decades to raise more than £60million for the prince’s charities will inevitably raise questions over Charles’s denials.

Accused over the years of being a “rent-a-royal”, Charles has been repeatedly photographed with foreign multi-millionaires at his own charity dinners and events to raise millions for the Prince’s Trust and to rebuild Dumfries House and the Castle of Mey in Scotland. Guests apparently paid up to £500,000 for an opulent dinner with Charles. Fawcett arranged those events and negotiated the donations. The question Charles faces is whether he knew Fawcett was allegedly demanding millions in return for access to himself.

Mahfouz, who denies any wrongdoing, was not entirely disappointed. The £1.5million he gave to Charles’s charities was rewarded by private meetings with the prince and a private ceremony at Buckingham Palace in November 2016, when Charles awarded the Saudi with an “honorary” CBE.

Mahfouz’s generosity was also remembered by Charles in naming a wood, gardens and benches after him at some of Britain’s oldest and most celebrated buildings. His donations helped renovate Dumfries House, saved for the nation by Charles in 2007 but without the £30million needed for its restoration and maintenance.

Securing that money from foreign millionaires was Fawcett’s task. Fawcett’s success depended on Charles’s direction and co-operation. Fawcett’s rise from a humble valet in Buckingham Palace in 1982 to being indispensable to Charles has been marked by a series of astonishing accusations. He has resigned twice before.

Fawcett wrote to Mahfouz in 2017, allegedly indicating that in return for his money, the Saudi would get a knighthood and more private meetings with Prince Charles

Fawcett was introduced into the world of seducing the ultra-rich to pay for access to Charles by an American, Robert Higdon.

Higdon had been hired in 1995 by Charles to raise money for his charities. The activities, though not illegal, are highly controversial.

Higdon brought many billionaires to Charles’s parties, and they gave £1million — and more — in charitable donations to sit next to Charles at dinner.

Higdon claimed that Charles knew every detail of his agreements with the American billionaires: How much they had paid and where they would sit at dinners. Higdon also arranged for Charles to use the billionaires’ yachts and private jets.

According to Higdon, every detail was discussed between himself and Charles, including the size of the donation. Fawcett was an excellent student of Higdon’s skills. On Charles’s orders, he approached a galaxy of property developers, bankers, lawyers, accountants and foreign billionaires from both sides of the Atlantic, Saudi Arabia, Latvia and Kyrgyzstan for money.

Implicit in the request for donations was the opportunity of a lunch or dinner with Charles and an assurance that a sizable donation would be rewarded with a room or bench named after the sponsor.

Among the many beneficiaries was Manuel Colonques, a Spanish tile manufacturer. In return for £1.6million, Colonques was allowed to invite 250 guests to Buckingham Palace for a dinner, captured over 36 pages by Hello! magazine.

There was also a private dinner with Charles and an invitation to Kate and William’s wedding. Charles also asked that Colonques “donate” an “Islamic garden” of 70,000 handmade mosaic tiles to Highgrove. “We gave the garden to him,” said the Spaniard’s spokes-man. “And he repaid us with a dinner for our clients.”

Fawcett explained that a £200,000 donation would guarantee his wife Alara could sit next to Charles at a dinner. The next day photographs of both Uzans with the prince were posted across the world. Cem Uzan was later indicted for racketeering in Turkey and sentenced in his absence to 23 years in prison.

Those controversial arrangements were apparently ignored by Charles, for good reason. After four years, Fawcett had raised £19million for his charitable foundation. But Charles’s appetite for money was apparently insatiable.

It was a familiar pattern with Mahfouz Marei Mubarak bin Mahfouz — only now it threatens to end in disgrace for Fawcett and possibly Charles.

There are concerns the Palace’s investigation of Fawcett’s alleged promises to Mahfouz will follow the same track as previous reports of some of Fawcett’s alleged wrongdoings if found proven.

 

Page 2 Prince Charles - Robert Higdon Collection

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